Managing Arthritis

Effective Management of Arthritis

Arthritis is an often debilitating condition affecting millions of people throughout the world. Arthritis is characterized as a progressive inflammatory condition of the joints, which may cause pain, swelling, heat, and redness due to inflammation, infection or trauma.
These symptoms may lead to limitation of movement, joint deformation and contractures.
Osteoarthritis is the most common noninflammatory degenerative joint disease occurring chiefly in older persons, characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, hypertrophy of bone and changes in the synovial membrane; which houses lubricating fluid of the joint. It is usually accompanied by pain (usually before prolonged activity) and stiffness (particularly after prolonged activity).
Billions of dollars a year are spent on the management of arthritis. There are many companies promoting fallacious products promising relief from this often chronic and painful condition. The following suggestions are some of the more effective proven ways of managing various types of arthritic conditions.
Therapeutic Rehab Specialists Physical Therapy Departments specialize in treating multiple types of arthritic conditions. Call us today at 813-876-8771 to find out how our effective treatment options can help you start living a more productive life with less pain.

  • NSAIDS such as and Celebrex, have been found to be effective in decreasing arthritic pain. They are the new generation of Cox 2 enzyme inhibitors, which make them safer on the stomach. Even though they have fewer side effects on the stomach, they have been found to decrease blood flow to the kidneys; therefore you should be adequately hydrated while taking these medications.
  • Low doses of over the counter NSAIDS containing Ibuprofen such as (Motrin and Aleve) have analgesic or (pain relieving) effects (200-400 mg), and at higher doses anti-inflammatory effects (800-1000 mg).Warning: High doses or long term use may result in gastric bleeding.
  • Diffuse pain, localized stiffness, crepitus, and inflammation may be related to or aggravated by allergies to food sources including: wheat/gluten products, dairy, corn, soy, eggs, chocolate, citrus, sugars, and red meat. Nightshade family plants such as eggplant, potatoes, peppers, and tomatoes may also aggravate inflammatory conditions. Other products to avoid are partially trans/ hydrogenated fats, sugars, and saturated fats. Use mono saturated (olive oil) and polyunsaturated oils that resist high temperatures for cooking. Avoid foods that irritate the gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the nervous system and lymphatic system lying in the (GI) tract.
  • Nutritional products recommended for osteoarthritis are the herbs: curcumin/tumeric and ginger, and antioxidants. Glucosamine sulfate is an amine sugar found in glycoproteins and naturally occurring carbohydrates known as glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The supplementation of between 1500-2000 mg/day or 1000mg twice a day (BID) has been found to be beneficial in people suffering from arthritic conditions and injuries involving the articular cartilage. Some studies have shown greater effectiveness than Ibuprofen after 6 to 8 weeks of supplementation, and actual increased joint space width on X-ray. It is recommended to start supplementation immediately after an injury to the articular cartilage. Low molecular weight good quality chondroitin sulfate is also recommended in doses up to 1200 mg/day. Warning: Due to sugar content, Diabetics should consult their Physician prior to usage.
  • Prostaglandins are chemicals in the body that help to control lymphocyte activity, which is a type of white blood cell that regulates immune activity and inflammation. There are 3 types of prostaglandins. These three groups are derived from the diet in the form of essential fatty acids. The balance of favorable type 1 and 3 prostaglandins to unfavorable type 2 prostaglandins can be improved by supplementing the diet with essential fatty acids such as linoleate and linolenate. Omega 3 fatty acids, eicosapentaeonic acid (EPA), which are found in cold water fish, and (GLA) gamma-linoleic acid are recommended. Omega 3 fatty acids are found in seeds, nuts, flax seed oil, eggs, and fish also reduce the risk of coronary events. Flax seed oil should be refrigerated and stored in a black bottle. It is recommended to use these fatty acids a minimum of 3 times a week. Celadrin is a blend of fatty acids and carbons that help to relieve systemic inflammation as well as have a beneficial effect on heart disease. Studies have shown improved pain levels, better function, and improved ROM just 30 min. after use.
  • Although NSAIDS are recommended to manage inflammatory conditions, the first 24 hours after post traumatic arthritic injuries, inflammation is essential for proper tissue healing. The immediate use of NSAIDS may decrease prostaglandin 2 production, which may initially result in less swelling but also decrease the strength of repairing tissue. Wait 24 hours prior to use.
  • NSAIDS such as and Celebrex, have been found to be effective in decreasing arthritic pain. They are the new generation of Cox 2 enzyme inhibitors, which make them safer on the stomach. Even though they have fewer side effects on the stomach, they have been found to decrease blood flow to the kidneys; therefore you should be adequately hydrated while taking these medications.
  • Low doses of over the counter NSAIDS containing Ibuprofen such as (Motrin and Aleve) have analgesic or (pain relieving) effects (200-400 mg), and at higher doses anti-inflammatory effects (800-1000 mg).Warning: High doses or long term use may result in gastric bleeding.
  • Diffuse pain, localized stiffness, crepitus, and inflammation may be related to or aggravated by allergies to food sources including: wheat/gluten products, dairy, corn, soy, eggs, chocolate, citrus, sugars, and red meat. Nightshade family plants such as eggplant, potatoes, peppers, and tomatoes may also aggravate inflammatory conditions. Other products to avoid are partially trans/ hydrogenated fats, sugars, and saturated fats. Use mono saturated (olive oil) and polyunsaturated oils that resist high temperatures for cooking. Avoid foods that irritate the gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the nervous system and lymphatic system lying in the (GI) tract.
  • Nutritional products recommended for osteoarthritis are the herbs: curcumin/tumeric and ginger, and antioxidants. Glucosamine sulfate is an amine sugar found in glycoproteins and naturally occurring carbohydrates known as glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The supplementation of between 1500-2000 mg/day or 1000mg twice a day (BID) has been found to be beneficial in people suffering from arthritic conditions and injuries involving the articular cartilage. Some studies have shown greater effectiveness than Ibuprofen after 6 to 8 weeks of supplementation, and actual increased joint space width on X-ray. It is recommended to start supplementation immediately after an injury to the articular cartilage. Low molecular weight good quality chondroitin sulfate is also recommended in doses up to 1200 mg/day. Warning: Due to sugar content, Diabetics should consult their Physician prior to usage.
  • Prostaglandins are chemicals in the body that help to control lymphocyte activity, which is a type of white blood cell that regulates immune activity and inflammation. There are 3 types of prostaglandins. These three groups are derived from the diet in the form of essential fatty acids. The balance of favorable type 1 and 3 prostaglandins to unfavorable type 2 prostaglandins can be improved by supplementing the diet with essential fatty acids such as linoleate and linolenate. Omega 3 fatty acids, eicosapentaeonic acid (EPA), which are found in cold water fish, and (GLA) gamma-linoleic acid are recommended. Omega 3 fatty acids are found in seeds, nuts, flax seed oil, eggs, and fish also reduce the risk of coronary events. Flax seed oil should be refrigerated and stored in a black bottle. It is recommended to use these fatty acids a minimum of 3 times a week. Celadrin is a blend of fatty acids and carbons that help to relieve systemic inflammation as well as have a beneficial effect on heart disease. Studies have shown improved pain levels, better function, and improved ROM just 30 min. after use.
  • Although NSAIDS are recommended to manage inflammatory conditions, the first 24 hours after post traumatic arthritic injuries, inflammation is essential for proper tissue healing. The immediate use of NSAIDS may decrease prostaglandin 2 production, which may initially result in less swelling but also decrease the strength of repairing tissue. Wait 24 hours prior to use.
  • NSAIDS such as and Celebrex, have been found to be effective in decreasing arthritic pain. They are the new generation of Cox 2 enzyme inhibitors, which make them safer on the stomach. Even though they have fewer side effects on the stomach, they have been found to decrease blood flow to the kidneys; therefore you should be adequately hydrated while taking these medications.
  • Low doses of over the counter NSAIDS containing Ibuprofen such as (Motrin and Aleve) have analgesic or (pain relieving) effects (200-400 mg), and at higher doses anti-inflammatory effects (800-1000 mg).Warning: High doses or long term use may result in gastric bleeding.
  • Diffuse pain, localized stiffness, crepitus, and inflammation may be related to or aggravated by allergies to food sources including: wheat/gluten products, dairy, corn, soy, eggs, chocolate, citrus, sugars, and red meat. Nightshade family plants such as eggplant, potatoes, peppers, and tomatoes may also aggravate inflammatory conditions. Other products to avoid are partially trans/ hydrogenated fats, sugars, and saturated fats. Use mono saturated (olive oil) and polyunsaturated oils that resist high temperatures for cooking. Avoid foods that irritate the gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the nervous system and lymphatic system lying in the (GI) tract.
  • Nutritional products recommended for osteoarthritis are the herbs: curcumin/tumeric and ginger, and antioxidants. Glucosamine sulfate is an amine sugar found in glycoproteins and naturally occurring carbohydrates known as glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The supplementation of between 1500-2000 mg/day or 1000mg twice a day (BID) has been found to be beneficial in people suffering from arthritic conditions and injuries involving the articular cartilage. Some studies have shown greater effectiveness than Ibuprofen after 6 to 8 weeks of supplementation, and actual increased joint space width on X-ray. It is recommended to start supplementation immediately after an injury to the articular cartilage. Low molecular weight good quality chondroitin sulfate is also recommended in doses up to 1200 mg/day. Warning: Due to sugar content, Diabetics should consult their Physician prior to usage.
  • Prostaglandins are chemicals in the body that help to control lymphocyte activity, which is a type of white blood cell that regulates immune activity and inflammation. There are 3 types of prostaglandins. These three groups are derived from the diet in the form of essential fatty acids. The balance of favorable type 1 and 3 prostaglandins to unfavorable type 2 prostaglandins can be improved by supplementing the diet with essential fatty acids such as linoleate and linolenate. Omega 3 fatty acids, eicosapentaeonic acid (EPA), which are found in cold water fish, and (GLA) gamma-linoleic acid are recommended. Omega 3 fatty acids are found in seeds, nuts, flax seed oil, eggs, and fish also reduce the risk of coronary events. Flax seed oil should be refrigerated and stored in a black bottle. It is recommended to use these fatty acids a minimum of 3 times a week. Celadrin is a blend of fatty acids and carbons that help to relieve systemic inflammation as well as have a beneficial effect on heart disease. Studies have shown improved pain levels, better function, and improved ROM just 30 min. after use.
  • Although NSAIDS are recommended to manage inflammatory conditions, the first 24 hours after post traumatic arthritic injuries, inflammation is essential for proper tissue healing. The immediate use of NSAIDS may decrease prostaglandin 2 production, which may initially result in less swelling but also decrease the strength of repairing tissue. Wait 24 hours prior to use.
  • NSAIDS such as and Celebrex, have been found to be effective in decreasing arthritic pain. They are the new generation of Cox 2 enzyme inhibitors, which make them safer on the stomach. Even though they have fewer side effects on the stomach, they have been found to decrease blood flow to the kidneys; therefore you should be adequately hydrated while taking these medications.
  • Low doses of over the counter NSAIDS containing Ibuprofen such as (Motrin and Aleve) have analgesic or (pain relieving) effects (200-400 mg), and at higher doses anti-inflammatory effects (800-1000 mg).Warning: High doses or long term use may result in gastric bleeding.